ACPanda

United States of America

Published Work

Transcendence

They came in the middle of the night, sweeping down across the land like a plague of locusts, consuming everything in their path, not caring for friend or foe, for adult or child, for men or women. The marauders came from the far north, wielding heavy battle axes stained with the blood of the previous raids. Huge men wearing animal skins and bear furs, with white skin and hair the color of gold. Who knew that people with such white hair and skin could stain the world so badly with their insanity?The villagers had heard the refugee’s words as they passed through
“A fearsome group,” they said, “Without a single bit of a heart within them.”
“Rubbish!” the Chief said, “Nobody would come that far to simply take what little we have.”
Griffin was only six at the time.
“I tell you! They don’t care! They want blood spilled, and that’s it! They want to see your severed bodies hanging...

Environmental Journalism Competition 2020

The Fist of Justice: Our Movement to Improve what is Necessary

 Imagine kicking a pole over and over again and then breaking your foot. You simply could have quit kicking the pole, so you wouldn't get a broken foot. 
Often, as humans, we find ourselves struggling in circumstances that we created. I may go as far as asserting that everything, every obstacle, every predicament, every dilemma the human society has ever encountered, was generated by our conceptions, conclusions, and concepts. Such is the case with climate change. 
 Every day I gaze out the window and observe us creating our dilemmas. Garbage litters the side of the highways. Cars pump carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. When I questioned my parents how they thought about this, they shrugged and openly told me that "it's always been like this. We don't have the power to change that." 
We, as a civilization, are failing miserably at what I regard as the principal obligations as an intelligent species: to preserve our habitat. We must take it...

Environmental Journalism Competition 2020

The Fist of Justice: Our Movement to Improve what is Necessary

 Often, as humans, we find ourselves struggling in circumstances that we created. I may go as far as asserting that everything, every obstacle, every predicament, every dilemma the human society has ever faced, was caused by our conceptions, conclusions, and concepts. Such is the case with climate change. 
 I am not the first to address climate change, nor the first to endeavor to bring it under a spotlight, nor the first teen to be passionate about something beyond my insignificant corner of the world. But I can be the one who accomplishes all three. My knowledge, my life extends farther than the boundaries of Bridgewater, or New Jersey, or the Northeast, perhaps surpassing the borders of the United States. I have taken steps on the opposite side of the world, in Europe, in Asia, and all over the U.S, and this has only driven me to a single resolution. We, as a civilization, are failing miserably at what I consider...

Environmental Journalism Competition 2020

The Fist of Justice: Our Movement to Improve what is Necessary

 Often, as humans, we find ourselves struggling in circumstances that we created. I may go as far as asserting that everything, every obstacle, every predicament, every dilemma the human society has ever faced, was caused by our conceptions, conclusions, and concepts. Such is the case with climate change. 
 I am not the first to address climate change, nor the first to endeavor to bring it under a spotlight, nor the first teen to be passionate about something beyond my insignificant corner of the world. But I can be the one who accomplishes all three. My knowledge, my life extends farther than the boundaries of Bridgewater, or New Jersey, or the Northeast, perhaps surpassing the borders of the United States. I have taken steps on the opposite side of the world, in Europe, in Asia, and all over the U.S, and this has only driven me to a single resolution. We, as a civilization, are failing miserably at what I consider...

My December Competition 2019

A Time to Live

    The icy wind rattles the window panes, howling outside, signaling the arrival of the winter. This year it arrives suddenly, quickly ushering out the prolonged fall, with drizzling rain replaced with snow, leaves replaced with frost, brown everywhere covered up with dazzling white, sparkling, gleaming in the few short hours of sunlight. The night is beautiful, with stars glimmering in the sky like silent sentries of the sun, shedding light on the world while the sun sleeps. During the short day, a nest hidden in the crook of the gutter, protected from the gales, lives three majestic, ruby-breasted robins, chirping with the ringing of the wind chimes, a symphony that exhibits the month that we call December perfectly.
   December is a time of reckoning, of remembering, of recognizing a year past. The symbolic end of the year is marked with celebrations. Christmas lights gleam from houses usually hidden by lush forest, now open to the rest of the world...

My December Competition 2019

A Time to Live

    The icy wind rattles the window panes, howling outside, signaling the arrival of this year’s winter. This year it arrives suddenly, quickly ushering out the prolonged fall, with drizzling rain replaced with snow, leaves replaced with frost, brown everywhere covered up with dazzling white, sparkling, gleaming in the few short hours of sunlight. The night is beautiful, with stars glimmering in the sky like silent sentries of the sleeping sun. A nest, hidden in the crook of the gutter, protected from the gales, hides three, majestic, ruby-breasted robins, chirping with the ringing of the wind chimes, a symphony that exhibits the month we call December perfectly.
    December is a time of reckoning, of remembering, or recognizing a year past. The symbolic end of the year is marked with celebrations. Christmas lights gleam from houses usually hidden by lush forest, now open to the rest of the world through bare branches and snowy lanes. Menorahs shine, flickering in the windowsills, guarding the warm,...

My December Competition 2019

A Time to Live

December
The icy wind rattles the window panes, howling outside, signaling the arrival of this year’s winter. This year it arrives suddenly, quickly ushering out the prolonged fall, with drizzling rain replaced with snow, leaves replaced with frost, brown everywhere covered up with dazzling white, sparkling, gleaming in the few short hours of sunlight. The night is beautiful, with stars glimmering in the sky like silent sentries of the sun, shedding light on the world while the sun sleeps. A nest, hidden in the crook of the gutter, protected from the gales, hides three, majestic, ruby-breasted robins, chirping with the ringing of the wind chimes, a symphony that exhibits the month we call December perfectly.
    December is a time of reckoning, of remembering, or recognizing a year past. The symbolic end of the year is marked with celebrations. Christmas lights gleam from houses usually hidden by lush forest, now open to the rest of the world through bare branches...

Novel Writing Competition 2019

Forbidden City

Forbidden City, Beijing, China
9:00 AM Beijing Time.
Enter, and The Game will begin. Turn away, and you will lose. William McAllister repeated these words to himself as his parents, their best friends from college, their daughter Amy, and he stepped out of a taxi and faced the entrance to the most famous building in the mega-city of Beijing, the capital of China: 故宫, Gu Gong, or the Forbidden City. Even though he had already been to the Shanghai tower, whose sheer size dwarfed any building in the capital, the huge, red 午门, or Wumen, or the Meridian Gate.  
“Construction on the Forbidden City began in 1406 and ended in 1420. It was commissioned by Emperor Yongle when he moved the capital of the Ming Dynasty from its historical location in Nanjing to Beijing,” Mr. Wang was saying as the entourage stepped out of the taxi. The Wangs were extremely influential people, in the city. After they graduated from Stanford...

Speech Writing Competition 2018

The Decline of Intellectualism

In 399 B.C.E, fearing the rise of intellectuals and the threat they posed to traditional power politics, the elite of Athens sentenced one of their own to death. Socrates, a notable philosopher in Athens, drank Hemlock because he had radical ideas about the world. In fear and ignorance of the knowledge Socrates possessed, the elite decided that they would do away with him. Even though this was 2000 years ago, the persecution of intellectuals continues today. The origins of this persecution? In schools, teens shun the so-called “Nerd” from friend circles, encouraging bookish kids to give up on their knowledge and pursue popularity instead. Also, the persecution is reflected in politics. Today, people are appealing to the lowest common denominator. The lowest common denominator is the most basic human being. Instead of appealing to a high intellectual, politicians are appealing to a person whom everyone can relate to. This lowers the expression on intellect to a point where no one...