Grace2Write

Australia

Guten Morgen!

I'm Haelie - a book loving, dog loving 15 year old. I am learning German, and also like to crochet.

Year 10
ISFJ-T
Christian
Bookworm
Poet
Writer
Curly Girl
Thunderbirds Are Go!
Adore HTTYD & Narnia soundtracks

Message to Readers

Enjoy! Oh, and if you would like a teensy bit of insight, read footnotes. I’d appreciate a like/comment/review/someone’s opinion.

Lexi (Edited Version)

November 25, 2021

Twenty-five-year-old Taelyr stared out across the bay. The sun slowly dipped behind the horizon, the glinting water gradually growing dull and dark. The young man sighed, bowing his head. Oh Dad. Where are you?
    It had been just over two years now since his Dad had gone missing. Two long years. Taelyr ran his hand over his rust-red hair, once again gazing across Guichen Bay. So dark. But peaceful. Then the raging storms come, and destroy it all. Like trials can a human life. He contemplated the letter he had sent off to the Sydney Morning Herald two weeks earlier. 
    “I told them about the island, Dad,” he whispered to the still waters. “I told them about how I grew up on Anchorak. About how I swam with the dolphins. I told them of your fishing and our rugged island lifestyle. I told them how you sent me to school on the mainland. The letters you and I exchanged while I attended boarding school. How when I came back, you were gone. I told them everything.” I had to, Dad. I know you would disapprove of them knowing about Anchorak. But I had to. I am going to find you, even if it kills me.
    A lump rose in Taelyr’s throat, his breathing becoming short and fast.  Why did you leave me? I need you. A single tear slid down Taelyr’s cheek; his heart felt ready to shatter into a million pieces. Where did you go?

                                                                                       ***

    Taelyr sat on the window seat, his head resting heavily on his hands. Still nothing. It had been three months since he had watched the sun set over Guichen Bay, sitting alone on the pier. I detest newspapers. I detest publicity. I detest-
    A knock sounded on the door. Taelyr jumped up. Before he could get there, a blonde head poked around the doorway, quickly followed by the gangly body of a local teenager.
    “Here Taelyr. Postman got this mixed up in our mail,” declared a broad-accented voice. 
Taelyr grinned at the hazel-eyed fisherboy, taking the proffered letter. “Thank you very much, Dan. I really appreciate it.”
    Dan blushed, a tinge of red mixing with the sprinkling of freckles on his cheeks. “Aw, Taelyr, you don’t have to give me thanks with all your fancy words. Besides, you’re a good guy. The boy brushed at his thatch of unruly hair, saying sincerely, “I’d do anythin’ for you, Taelyr.” 
    Taelyr laughed, laying a sturdy hand on the boy’s shoulder. “Well, it is good to know someone appreciates me.”  It’s good to know someone appreciates me, his Dad’s voice echoed in his mind. 
    Dan’s face crumpled into an impish grin. “Is that fishin’ trip still on later this week?” 
    “Definitely. I would not miss it for anything,” Taelyr replied.
    The teenager flashed Taelyr a grin, darting back out the door. “Gotta go! Darren Hull is waitin’ for me at the quay!” 
    “Give him my regards, will you?” Taelyr called, waving to the boy. 
    “Sure thing!” Dan yelled back, making headway down the street. 
    Taelyr smiled to himself, turning his attention to the letter. “Well, what is this?”  He eased the envelope flap upwards, wincing as the edge stabbed his thumb. 

‘Dear Taelyr,’ it ran. ‘We sent your story to several well-known international papers, and have received feedback from one in particular. From the reply we received, and some research we undertook, we have reason to believe that your father could be in Germany… It was also uncovered that he has been trying to trace and make contact with a person named Lexi Pfeiffer. We understand this may come as a shock… Sincerely, Sydney Morning Herald Editorial Office.

    Taelyr’s head swam. Lexi Pfeiffer? Who on earth could that be? A wave of dizziness swept over him. I need to sit down. He rubbed his eyes, reading over the contents of the letter once more. Lexi… Dad, how are you connected with this stranger?

                                                                                    ***

Lexi.

Taelyr’s finger traced the name on the frosted glass. Who was she? He longed to know. 

A child dancing in the falling rain, rivulets of water running down her legs. 

The rain drizzled down the glass pane, the storm clouds above casting a grey cloud across the valley.

The musical laugh of a girl brimming with joy, as she gently pulls the long stalks of waving purple rock lilies from the ground.

Taelyr closed his eyes, trying to remember; doing his hardest to piece together the shattered memories. 

Sparkling brown eyes; gentle hands as she strokes her baby brother’s soft red curls. 

The clock hands slowly moved from number to number. Tick, tock, tick, tock. Constant and steady. 

All traces of joyous laughter are gone, replaced by tears and worry. Small hands cling to an ailing mother.

His mother had a clock. His Dad had told him many times. One designed with swirls and gilt edges. A tall, proud, colonial timepiece that she had loved dearly. 

Clouded eyes, staring at a stately clock. “Mummy,” a small voice whispers brokenly. Hot tears run down crimson cheeks.

His mother had died. Swift and sudden, with no warning. How could you raise me alone, Dad; pour your life into me, and then just leave? Unless… unless there had been another child? Do I have a sibling? 

“No, you can’t take me from Daddy and baby Taelyr!” she screams. A stern aunt grasps her firmly, whisking her away from her father.

Taelyr gazed out the window at the wildflowers, their fragile petals fluttering in the breeze. Purple rock lillies. Dad said they were Mum’s favourite. He closed his eyes. Faint recollections of his father fretting over letters from a relative. Blurred visions of a girl with auburn hair and sparkling brown eyes. Who was she? As sudden as lightning strikes, he remembered. Those blurred visions became clear; the broken puzzle whole again.

His eyes widened; his breathing quickened. 

Lexi is my sister.
This is an excerpt from a novella I’ve been working on called ‘Dolphin Boy’. I took the expert review criticism on the original excerpt and tried to incorporate some points within the word count. Let me know what you think!

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7 Comments
  • Dhanyata

    I am sorry, I had to delete the first version of 'Beware of Danger.' I corrected it and published another version. Thanks for liking the earlier version!


    13 days ago
  • HorizonStar

    This is an excellent piece, I really enjoy the way your overall style of writing. Great work!


    15 days ago
  • V-Rose

    Re: Totally! I'm thinking about connecting it to another piece but I'm not sure yet... Will keep you updated though! And also, I'm not totally sure what their ages are. I think they're probably teenagers, but that's as much as I know at this point (hehe).


    17 days ago
  • Helena

    I love this!! You are such a great writer, Haelie!


    22 days ago
  • PaperNHeartsA

    Woah.. I would love to read more!! (ps. thank you so much!)


    23 days ago
  • SamRose

    Re: Aww tysm!! For all of those things!


    23 days ago
  • Anne Blackwood

    Re: Thank you!


    23 days ago