musicmaker

United States

Christian/writer (obviously)/musician/
homeschooler/flibbertigibbet/sarcastic/
mischievous/talkative/all lives matter

Message to Readers

Hey all! I'd love to hear your feedback, no matter what your religious background! Have any of you run into hateful Christians? Did that change your perspective on them?

Hateful Christians

October 27, 2020

FREE WRITING

4
This piece is mainly directed at Christians. Everyone else can just sit back, nod their heads, and judge Christians for being judgmental. ;-)
                I’ve heard story after story of how people hate Christians because they felt so judged and hated for what they’ve done, how they thought, who they were, or what they looked like. It makes me sick! So I thought I’d make a little comparison in the form of some modern day parables. I know this isn’t typical but how about two parables, same scenario, different reactions, and I’ll top it off with the standard set by the dude Christians claim to follow. Just hang with me.
Reaction #1
I didn’t know why I was there; I didn’t belong. Looking up at the towering steeple and watching people quietly file through the double doors, Bibles held ritually at their sides. I made sure my long sleeves were pulled down to my wrists and then shoved my hands in my pockets to conceal the tattoos that covered most of my body. I had taken out my gages on the way here but the holes in my ears were very obvious. I didn’t know if I should have worn a tuxedo or not but I didn’t have one anyway so I just wore my nicest T-shirt and jeans. My kids climbed out of my old, banged up, pick-up truck. I wondered what the church-goers would do about the kids. I hadn’t seen their mom in years and didn’t know what would happen if the holy-rollers found out I was divorced?
So many thoughts came to my mind. I knew my life was a mess. Some of it wasn’t my fault, most of it was. That’s why I stood in that church parking lot, about to take the first step to getting my life back together. What if God won’t forgive me?
I risked it. My kids and I strolled up to the church building, Bible-less and God-less. We looked as out of place as dogs in a cat show. I felt the cold stares. They looked at my tattoos that I couldn’t totally hide. They stared at the piercings in my ears, and I’m sure they knew the situation with my mother-less kids. The person who stood at the door handing out pamphlets backed up a bit, like I was going to bite him. People paused their quiet, library-worthy conversations to glance at me with a look that said “you don’t belong here”. I felt sick to my stomach. Why was I there? Why would God let me in? If the people of this church can’t handle me, how could a perfect God?
I stayed for the whole service though. I felt like the pastor was judging me even from the pulpit. No one spoke to me during the whole service. I was done. I and my kids stood up and walked out, not looking back. I learned a few things that day in that service. I didn’t belong, God couldn’t possibly want me, and I’m never coming back again.
 
Reaction #2
I didn’t know why I was there; I didn’t belong. Looking up at the towering steeple and watching people quietly file through the double doors, Bibles held ritually at their sides. I made sure my long sleeves were pulled down to my wrists and then shoved my hands in my pockets to conceal the tattoos that covered most of my body. I had taken out my gages on the way here but the holes in my ears were very obvious. I didn’t know if I should have worn a tuxedo or not but I didn’t have one anyway so I just wore my nicest T-shirt and jeans. My kids climbed out of my old, banged up, pick-up truck. I wondered what the church-goers would do about the kids. I hadn’t seen their mom in years and didn’t know what would happen if the holy-rollers found out I was divorced?
So many thoughts came to my mind. I knew my life was a mess. Some of it wasn’t my fault, most of it was. That’s why I stood in that church parking lot, about to take the first step to getting my life back together. What if God won’t forgive me?
I risked it. My kids and I strolled up to the church building, Bible-less and God-less. We looked as out of place as dogs in a cat show but no one seemed to mind. They welcomed me immediately, greeting me and my kids, shaking hands and introducing me to everyone. I was taken by surprise. I knew they could see right through me, the looks in their eyes said the understood. No one even glanced at my tattoos, no one frowned at my piercings, and my kids were immediately invited to come to the children’s group.
Some of the men hailed me over to ask my opinion on something they were having a friendly argument about. I’d met at least ten people before the service even began. Some of the people I’d met invited me to sit with them and I readily accepted. The pastor was friendly and so was his sermon. He preached on the grace and love of God. It was so clear and passionate that by the end I knew that I had not been rejected by God like I had by so many people. Somehow, nothing I had ever done or ever would do, changed God’s love for me!
There was a potluck after the service, which I learned was the definition of a good church, and when people began to leave I realized that I didn’t want to. I’d never been so welcomed before.
I learned a few things that day in that service. I belonged, God loved me enough to pay for my sins, and I’m coming back!
 
Which church would you rather be a part of? Which would you rather be known as? Does Jesus want us to welcome sinners? Isn’t the church supposed to keep away from sin? Biggest lie of all time! Christians are to try their hardest to be pure but that doesn’t mean we avoid anyone else. That would be ridiculous. Remember, we are just as sinful as everyone else. Don’t use Christianity as an excuse. We should actually be reaching our world more. Jesus did. Here’s what He did (a lot of the detail is artistic license, but a lot is taken from the John Chapter 8). Here we go:
 
Dust flew up into my face as I was shoved to the ground in front of the Rabbi. I knew I was on death row. I’d been caught. What I thought I could get away with had turned and bit me and now I was facing the consequences.
A mob surrounded me, yelling and holding rocks, ready to stone me. My tears wet the dust on the ground below me. The mocking and judgements that were hurled at me hurt more then I thought the stones would.
“Teacher,” The leader of the mob addressed the Rabbi who sat in front of me, “this woman has been caught in the very act of committing adultery,” He pointed an accusing finger at me.
“Now in the Law, Moses commanded us to stone such women; what then do You say?” It seemed like they were testing the Rabbi, I didn’t know why. I winced and waited for him to pronounce my punishment. But he didn’t say a word, he just bent down and began writing something in the dirt.
The mob raised their eyebrows and cleared their throats, demanding an answer. The Rabbi looked up.
“He who is without sin among you, let him be the first to throw a stone at her.” He replied, then returned to writing in the dirt.
My heart stopped. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. The crowds began to mumble then a few shuffled off. Slowly, the mob dispersed, leaving me face down in front of the Rabbi.
“Where are they?” He said.
I looked up, his eyes were kind.
“Did no one condemn you?” He asked.
I shook my head.
“No…no one Lord.” I replied.
“I don’t condemn you, either.” He smiled. “Go. And don’t do that again.” He said solemnly.
I nodded. Something was different about this man. He was not the normal religious leader. I looked him in the eye and gasped. I don’t know why but somehow I knew. This was the messiah we had been waiting for! I was kneeling before God Himself and He had just pronounced me not-guilty! I wept. I had been accepted by the God of the universe! No one had ever acted like this before! This man was different, and I wanted to be a part of His mission!
 
 
So, what do you all think? Have we been doing this “Christian thing” wrong? I think so.
I’ve got a challenge for you. This is not for everyone. This challenge is for the bravest, strongest, and toughest Christians. Here’s the challenge.
Change it.
That’s all. Well, not all. It’s not as easy as it sounds. Dare to be different! This ain’t easy. That’s why this challenge isn’t for cowards. If you’re a Christian, start acting like it. Christian means “follower of Christ” so do what Christ did. Welcome the outcast, don’t worry about what they’ve done. That’s not your job. Someday it might be. When someone truly needs you to guide them or intervene, but not judge until people are ready. And never be nasty. When you judge, you should only be judging Christians, we have not authority to judge anyone else. You cannot expect non-Christians to act like Christians. So don’t try and change them, change you.
Just because you’re a teenager doesn’t mean you don’t have impact. Bring your friends, welcome them. Start a revival in your town. Dare to be a faithful Christian!

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4 Comments
  • musicmaker

    So right Emi! People don't want any part of Christianity if all we're doing is beating them up over their problems. You cannot expect non-Christians to act like Christians; all we can do is love them so hard they can't resist Jesus!


    2 months ago
  • Emi (Revival Year #NEWYEAR)

    I absolutely agree! As my youth pastor says, we shouldn't be "Bible-thumpers." I also love your example from the Bible!


    2 months ago
  • Rachaelgrace

    This piece makes a lot of sense to me! It’s really sad but true. It’s why we need to stand with those who are suffering.


    3 months ago
  • almost flora kane

    i totally agree with you as a christian who is constantly trying to make up for the mistakes of other christians/churches in the past to invite more people into their identity as loved by God. i so wish others would realize what their judgmental actions mean to others who are already skeptical of what this religion is. thank you for writing this!


    3 months ago