BizzleWrites

Australia

I'm Issy.
I'm 14 and an aspiring artist and author.
She/her
Black Lives matter.
Likes:
Bi puns
Murder mystery TV shows
Art
Shakespeare poetry
Dislikes:
I can't even be bothered writing them all down
.
Goodbi
Have a nice day

Message from Writer

Remember to write even if you think you are bad at it, you're not

Roses And Naan Bread #myrose

June 25, 2020

FREE WRITING

4
The first rose on my desk was kind of cute. By the fifteenth it was getting kind of weird.
    As a fourteen year-old nerd, I never thought I would get a date, let alone a secret admirer. I shouldn't be that surprised really, I've been asked out a couple of times, but it always happens to be someone I cannot stand. I just want my Newton Pulsifer from Good Omens. Is that to much to ask? Or maybe Mr Darcy . . .
    Anyway, today there was another rose and love note on my desk. They are always typed out, probably so I don't recognize the hand'writing, and this one is no exception. It reads:
    Dear Jay, 
    Shall I compare thee to a summers day?

    Very funny, My secret admirer put a Shakespeare quote on it this time, this is getting weirder by the minute. 
    "Hey, another note from Mr very secret admirer?" my best friend Kitty asks, coming up behind me. 
    "Yeah, he's gone really all out this time, Shakespeare-see." I hold the note out to kitty, but at that second the weird-not-bell-but-music-instead plays, distracting us. I shove the note in my back pocket, grabbing the rose and putting it in my backpack. 
    After school, Kitty invites me over to her house for afternoon tea. we've always been those two, weirdly wholesome, girls. Ever since we first met as eight-year-olds.
    We walk up the garden path, past the beautiful-if very small-garden. Kitty opens the wooden door to her house, her parents never keep it locked. I step in behind her, taking in the delicious aroma of freshly baked naan-bread.
     I love coming to Kitty's place, her parents always have some sort of delicious food being made. Her mother is an chef, who moved from India a year before Kitty was born and owns a restaurant, her father is a graphic designer. it would be awesome to have that combination of parents.
    "Maa, I brought Jay with me."
    Kitty's Mum, Aabha, looks up from where she is placing naan bread onto plates, and pouring home-made lemonade. "Hello, you two. Back from school are we?"
    "It appears so?" I joke, taking a seat at the kitchen table. I notice a pare of scissors sitting there, with some thorns littered around them. I peer round a vase of roses. I have always loved Kitty's house, everything is old-fashioned, with a combination of English and Indian traditional decoration. An oriental rug sits on the wooden floor boards, beside a Victorian walnut-wood writing desk, covered in Kitty's science homework.
    "Kitty tells me you have a secret admirer?" Aabha says, cocking her head.
    Kitty glares at her, scowling slightly, in that way that teens do when their parent has made a dad-joke or something. "Maa," she says, in a warning tone.
    "Oh, didn't mean to be a pain." She gives Kitty a mischievous smile, like there's something the two of them aren't telling me.
    "It's fine, Aabha. Yes, I do have a secret admirer. We think it's this annoying boy who keeps flirting with me."
    "Well, keep me posted on that then." She gives me one of her smiles. Her smiles are warm and motherly, when she was a teacher she could calm students down so easily, she would talk to them and be understanding when other teachers wouldn't. I've often wished Aabha was my teacher, but she stopped teaching when she started the restaurant.
    "Come on, there's naan over here and you'r going to miss out," Kitty says, abruptly diverting the conversation away from my secret admirer. They haven't even started the naan yet.
    "Don't rush Jay, having a secret admirer is tiring."
    Kitty tilts her head. "You had a secret admirer?"
    "Well, your father did used to be a bit socially awkward. It runs in the family, you know."
    I giggle, taking my plate of naan bread from her. The first time Kitty and I met, she stood by a tree for half an hour, waiting for someone to approach her to be friends. We were both in a new class, as we had just turned eight, the class were doing an ice breaker game outside and you were supposed to introduce yourself to someone.
    As we eat our naan bread we chat about how Kitty and I are going at school, make guesses as to who my secret admirer is, and listen to interesting stories about Aabha's time as a teacher.
    Kitty's ten-year-old brother Hridaan sprints in, with that young kid never ending energy. Her runs over to the bench, takes a seat on one of the bar-stalls, and perches there, out of breath.
    Kitty looks at him. "Good God! What is that?" she splutters, staring at the strange object in Hridaan's hands.
    The object in question appears to be some sort of cross between a rugby ball and winged horse. It is mostly a normal rugby ball, but it has taped on white wings, and a few pieces of cream wool as at tail. 
    "We made it as a team building exercise," Hridaan pants. "It's funner than when you had to do Shakespeare quotes for your team building."
    Aabha smiles. "Kitty has been obsessed ever since. Though something tells me you wont be quite so obsessed with making . . . whatever this is?"
    I grin. Hridaan is like a brother to me, I've known him since he was four, and it is incredibly fun teasing him. "I think you made a very wonderful . . . Hermes." 
    He scowls. "It's not Hermes, it's a flying rugby ball. The tail helps it balance, like an ostrich. And it's wings make it fly." He pauses. "I got to take it home because I helped the most, so there."
    "So there," I say hopping off my stall and walking over to Kitty's writing desk. Her science notes are typed neatly, unlike mine-which look like a spider crawled across them. I take a seat at her desk, quickly skim-reading her notes. The two of us have an agreement: if one of us ever needs to, we can read and copy the other ones notes. 
    "Jay's naughty, she's copying Kitty's notes. My teacher told me that if we copy someone else's homework, we will fail! And we will get kicked out of school . . ." he pauses dramatically, "forever!"
    "I'm sure Jay has a very good reason for copying your sisters notes, don't you Jay?" Aabha winks at me.
    "Oh, yes. Doctor who time-traveled from where-ever he is . . . and stole my notes!"
    Hridaan pouts. "Stop treating me like a toddler! You never treated Kitty like that!"
    I give Aabha a guilty glance, maybe we did overdo it a bit. I would have thrown a fit if people had treated me like that at ten.
    Kitty jumps to my defense. "Jay was only joking, it's fine bro." 
    I continue copying Kitty's neatly typed notes.
    Kitty continues trying to console Hridaan. "Now, listen. Do you want to hear something funny?"
    Hridaan nods.
    "Jay got a note from a secret admirer, and it read Shall I compare thee to a summers day."
    "the,
 that's just stupid." 
    Kitty looks annoyed. "It's the way people spoke in the olden days, Dummy!" 
    I do not know what I've started, possibly a family feud, but I've got to get Kitty and I out of here before I make things worse. "Thank you for the naan Aabha, it was delicious. But Kitty and I have some friends to meet with, so I think we need to go now."
    Kitty rolls her eyes at Hridaan. "Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow. My necessaries are embark'd: farewell Hridaan!" I think that's a line from Shakespeare. 
    It was Kitty that told me when I received the first note that it was Shakespeare. 
    Once outside, we walk along Greenwood Lane, towards the park. Kitty links her arm through mine, pulling the two of us along.
    "What do you wanna bet that it's Stacy Hansen?" I say, nudging her. Stacy is the most popular boy in school, Not that I necessarily want it to be a boy. Kitty is the only one outside of my family who knows that I'm bisexual, I'm not closeted exactly-everyone just assumes that I'm straight. If someone actually asked, I wouldn't say that I was straight.
    "Sure, I mean it probably is him: everyone saw the way he looked at you at the recital."
    "Yeah, but does he know any Shakespeare?"
    Kitty thinks about this. "I'm sure he probably does." 
    We walk on a way, continuing to the park.
    Sitting on the bench in the park, Kitty asks me, "Who do you hope your secret admirer is?"
    The question is such an interesting one, I stare at her. I never really thought about who I hope that it is, only who it probably really is. "I don't know . . . Kiki is cute . . ." Kiki is a girl in our English class, we don't know her that well, but she is kind of pretty. I don't really have a crush, I would date someone if they asked me out, but I don't have a crush.
    Just then I notice that Kitty is staring at the grass. "What is it?" I ask, at her sad expression.
    "Nothing! It's nothing." But she doesn't convince me. I've known Kitty long enough to know when something's up, but I decide to leave it for now.
    I walk into the classroom for English the next day, Kitty's already there. She and a few other kids are looking at something on a desk . . . my desk.
    "Jay! There's another rose and a note." She beckons me over. 
    "Someone must really like you . . ." a boy says. It's funny really: one of his friends told me that he like me.
    I push through the crowd, picking up the small slip of paper. It reads:
    I'm sick and tired of hiding,
    Meet me in the courtyard after school. 
    P.S Mr Sampson's new science experiment was really weird, right?

    I new my admirer was a student at my school, now it appears they are in my science class as well. I shove the note in my pocket, shooing away the small group of kids. "Shoo, this isn't a romantic comedy, set up for your amusement." I take a smell of the rose, Turkish Delight.
    An hour later, after the weird-music-instead-of-a-bell has played, I grab Kitty. "Come on, I'm going to finally find out who my secret admirer is. you have to come with me for moral support." I give her puppy-dog eyes.
    "Sorry, can't. Mum set up some weird extra curricular maths thing. I have to go there now."
    I sigh. I wanted to bring someone with me, but I guess I'm going into this alone.
    As I walk into the courtyard, I wonder who it's going to be. Who would be that shy, so that they would leave roses and love notes on my desk for weeks, And only now, would they actually want to reveal them-self?
    On the bench, where Kitty and I sit all the time, is a figure. They are facing away from me, so I can't tell who it is. And I am now, because of their height doubting that it is Stacy at all.
    "Hello?" I say, edging closer to the mysterious figure.
    They turn around slowly, their face is hidden by a hoody, which looks strangely familiar. "Jay." Their voice is familiar. My hand flies to my mouth in shock, all this time . . . 
    "I-I don't know what to say . . . I just . . ." I cannot believe my ears, maybe I'm wrong . . . but I could swear that that voice belongs to Kitty.
    "I'm sorry I left you guessing, if you hoped it was someone else, I'm sorry you didn't know sooner."
    I rush forwards, taking a seat beside her. "Kitty, I can't believe it's you!" The truth is, I've had feelings for Kitty for a while now. But because she's my best friend . . . I've kept them hidden from everyone-including myself. I just dismissed the idea of dating her a few months ago, deciding it was silly to even suggest it, because something like that could ruin our friendship if she didn't like me back. Maybe that's why Kitty didn't tell me for so long too. 
    "Please don't let this ruin our friendship, I don't know what I would do without you . . . " Kitty says, not meeting my gaze.
    "No, it won't ruin anything. In fact . . . I think things will be better this way."
    Kitty fidgets with her backpack straps. "What do you mean?"
    "How can you not know? Kitty, how could you not tell?"
    "Do you mean we'd be better off without each-other? Please don't mean that," Kitty mumbles.
    How can she even think that I'd mean that? "Of course not, I mean-I feel the same way." Now it's my turn to look everywhere but her.
    "Jay, you are the most wonderful girl I've ever met," Kitty says, finally taking a hint. She leans toward me, and we kiss. Under the eucalyptus tree, in the middle of the school courtyard. And it's both of our first kiss, and it's perfect.
For Prompt Four

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  • June 25, 2020 - 8:12pm (Now Viewing)

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3 Comments
  • batman_is_a_cracker

    Very cute and delightfully wordy. The dialogue has this Hallmark movie vibe that is just *chef kiss*. The fact that it's so clear from the very beginning that the secret admirer's Kitty really butters my biscuit, you know? And I can't ignore the fact that it's got that sweet, sweet gay representation up in here. Honestly, after the writing guidelines changed, I feel like WtW got way more straight and Christian than before. Just me? idk
    --Sid


    5 months ago
  • batman_is_a_cracker

    Howdy partner. As you may or may not know, I'm back on WtW (sorta) and I'm offering "free" Peer Reviews to anyone willing to ask. Recently I decided to finish what I started all those months ago and commemorate all of the people who entered into my second (and last) user-hosted competition, #myrose. I'll be doing this by commenting my notes and things I loved about the piece, and - upon request - peer-reviewing any pieces of the user's choice. Let's get started, shall we?


    5 months ago
  • batman_is_a_cracker

    Howdy. Thanks for entering my comp, bro! This piece was so cute. I love the unsubtle hinting that the secret admirer was actually Kitty. Good job on this piece and good luck in my competition~


    11 months ago